Wealthy Qatar Weathers Siege, but Personal and Political Costs Grow

Wealthy Qatar Weathers Siege, but Personal and Political Costs Grow
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Wealthy Qatar Weathers Siege, but Personal and Political Costs Grow
“It’s not a problem.” For the countries leading the blockade — Saudi Arabia, the United Arab Emirates, Egypt
and Bahrain — it illuminates the challenge of laying economic siege to the world’s richest country per capita.
But American policy on the dispute has had an inconstant quality of late, with the State Department offering sharp criticism of the Saudi
and Emirati demands — which it called the product of an old grudge — while President Trump has sided firmly with the countries leading the blockade.
The last spat, in 2014, led Saudi Arabia and the United Arab Emirates to withdraw their ambassadors from Doha in protest for seven months.
Sheikh Saif said that We can cover the financial aspect without even tapping into our investments,
The four countries agreed to a request by Kuwait, which has been acting as a mediator in the dispute, to extend by 48
hours the deadline for Doha to comply, according to a joint statement published by the Saudi state news agency SPA.
When four Arab nations blockaded Qatar’s airspace and shipping channels last month in a bid to force it to drop its maverick foreign policy
and shutter its influential TV station, Al Jazeera, there was an initial burst of panic as some supermarket shelves emptied.
Some American officials say Mr. Trump’s policy is being driven by two advisers, Stephen K. Bannon
and Sebastian Gorka, who are firmly in the Saudi camp, and who see harsh punishment of Qatar as a warning to any country accused of indulging Islamists.
Some Saudis on Twitter have delighted in mocking the Turkish milk being drunk in Qatar, terming it “donkey
milk,” while young Qataris have turned to Snapchat for humorous, doggedly partisan takes on the crisis.
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